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Brockmoor Primary School

 

Curriculum Narrative

 

      
  

CURRICULUM NARRATIVE
SUBJECT - RE

    
 

 

 

 

 

Aims of the EYFS Curriculum

  • Understanding that people living in Dudley, UK and around the world follow different religions and some may not follow any religion.
  • Become familiar with the names of different religions such as Christianity, Islam, Sikhism, Hinduism, Judaism
  • Listen to and have the opportunity to act out religious stories
  • Have the opportunity to see, touch, handle, taste items that have an importance to religious and non-religious worldviews such as food, music, clothing, objects, books, buildings.

Aims of the KS1 Curriculum

  • Explore six principal religions; Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Sikhism and Buddhism and symbols associated with these (20% core Christianity and Islam)
  • Identify, understand and explore beliefs associated with god or gods. Recognise and understand that not all people believe in God
  • Explore the importance of rituals that religious people may undertake when praying or taking part in festivals.
  • Explore beliefs  about founders and/or religious leaders of their religious or worldviews
  • Listen to and recall a range of religious stories. Reflect on lessons that could be learnt
  • Raise questions about the above and given the opportunity to discuss their own views.

Aims of the Lower KS2 Curriculum

  • Name and identify Christianity and at least three other principal religions
  • Explore Humanism and their beliefs on the world and life
  • Identify significant beliefs associated with God particularly understood within the Abrahamic religious traditions such as god is powerful, he can’t be seen, he passes on revelations through angels. Children should also understand that not all people believe in a God
  • Reflect on specific prayers such as ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ and understand meaning behind these. Reflect on different methods of praying and why might people pray using different methods
  • Understand the significant message of a story, what impact these stories have on a person’s life and how these stories may determine the way a person acts or takes part in festivals or rituals
  • Opportunity to raise and discuss questions not only about their own views but also how and why these beliefs may be important to a religious or non-religious person

Aims of the Upper KS2 Curriculum

Children should revisit stories from holy books and religious and non-religious world views ensuring these are embedded. They will have a secure understanding of two principal religions, Christianity and Islam, and be able to speak confidently about these beliefs, their own beliefs and other people’s beliefs. They will have a secure understanding of the 7 areas highlighted by the Dudley Agreed Syllabus which include:

  • Religious and non-religious worldviews:
  • Name and identify 6 principal religions; Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism and Sikhism, with related symbols.
  • Identify Humanism as a non-religious worldview and their beliefs about God
  • Understand Humanism beliefs about right and wrong and these do not come from rules or laws from God.
  • Significant Beliefs:
  • Discuss and reflect on beliefs and views about miracles from different religions and worldviews
  • Discuss and reflect on beliefs and views about life and death from different religions and worldviews
  • Discuss and reflect on beliefs and views about salvation from different religions and worldviews
  • Understand beliefs associated with Jesus, his life, resurrection, saviour
  • Beliefs about God:
  • Identify beliefs associated with God particularly understood by the Abrahamic faiths but also compare and contrast with other principal religions
  • Understand how God’s message was passed on to people through angels. What were these messages and their importance
  • Discuss what right and wrong is and how religious people believe these come from rules/laws from God
  • Pupils should also learn that some people do not believe in God (atheism) or some remain undecided (agnostic)
  • Pupils should raise their own questions, discuss their own beliefs and encouraged to explain or give reasons
  • Worship:
  • Discuss, analyse and reflect on specific prayers such as ‘The Lord’s Prayer’ (Bible), ‘Al-Fatiha’ (Quran), Aastoma Sadgamya (Hinduism) etc and encouraged to discuss what these mean
  • Discuss different types of prayers and whether some are better than others. Reflect on stories such as ‘The Parable of the Pharisee and the Tax Collector’.
  • Explore questions about different types of prayers and which is the most appropriate prayer. For example, boastful and vindictive from stories
  • Pupils should give their own opinions on worship, whether they have prayed, how they have prayed and give examples of prayers being answered
  • Stories:
  • Recall stories that are significant for people with both religious and non-religious worldviews
  • Reflect on messages and meanings a story may be expressing and why they are important examples for religious people to live by
  • Develop skills to improve how they interpret or understand the meaning or message a story may be expressing by: gaining knowledge about the circumstances in which the story was originally told; whether the interpretation is consistent with other teaching expressed within the same religion or worldview; clues in the story which indicate its true interpretation; awareness that translation may alter or lead to a distorted interpretation
  • Festivals:
  • Identify festivals associated with different religions
  • Recall events from stories that are linked with festivals, the message these stories portray and why the festival is celebrated
  • Explore how festivals are celebrated; food, clothing, music, ceremonies etc
  • People of faith:
  • Explore the life and work of individuals from history who were influenced by religion such as Mother Teresa
  • Understand how their views were influenced by religion
  • Reflect on how they have contributed to the happiness and welfare of people and communities

Curriculum Transitions

  • How KS1 builds upon EYFS – In EYFS, children are made aware that there are people who have different religions and be taught factual information on what their beliefs are. Key stage 1 builds on this knowledge. Children not only learn factual information but are encouraged to ask questions based on religious information as well sharing their own beliefs. However, they may not be fully aware as to why they are following a particular religion other than something practised at home.
  • How LSKS2 builds upon KS1 – children will build on Key stage 1 knowledge by not only broadening their knowledge on religions and non-religion worldviews but will also be encouraged to explain why a person of a particular religion may follow or practice certain rituals. They will be able to compare and contrast different religions and given opportunities to share their beliefs and encouraged to explain why they believe this.
  • How UKS2 builds upon LKS2 – Having had a good understanding of different religions at this point, children will be given the opportunity to discuss and debate open ended questions. For example, why do religious people believe in God? Where is the evidence? Children will also be able to share their own beliefs and have opportunities to support their beliefs using evidence.
  • How UKS2 prepares children for KS3/Secondary readiness – Moving into secondary school, children from Brockmoor will be exposed to and will be interacting with people from a wider range of backgrounds and cultures. They will be more open and tolerant towards other people’s religious and non-religious beliefs. They will be able to understand why certain people behave or dress the way they do and they will also feel more confident in their own beliefs and be able to express their beliefs during KS3 lessons

Curriculum Sequencing

  • Specific skills that are developed and how – children will gain factual knowledge about religious and non-religious worldviews. They will be able to share their own beliefs through discussion and be able to explain why they or other people may act in a certain way through questioning.
  • Revisiting of topics – when and why – Christmas and Easter will be revisited in all year groups. As the school year is based around the Georgian calendar, it is important that theses major Christian celebrations are revisited in every year group. However, children will begin in KS1 gaining factual knowledge and recalling stories of both Christmas and Easter events to then gradually moving onto learning the importance of each celebration in depth
  • Why the curriculum has been sequenced in the order it has – It is important for children to understand that there are differences in people from a very early age. They begin in EYFS and KS1 learning what these differences and similarities are and encouraged to share their own beliefs. Once children understand the facts, as they move further through school, it becomes more generic where children can compare similarities and differences between their beliefs and others around them.

Curriculum Differentiation

  • How children are able to achieve Greater Depth -  The RE curriculum has been differentiated by year groups allowing most children to achieve in their year group. According to the Dudley Agreed syllabus, an age related Year 2 child should begin Year 3 on level 2. A greater depth Year 2 child would begin Year 3 on level 3. Teachers should be able to challenge greater depth pupils using the eight level scale (see curriculum assessment and intervention section)
  • Other support that is in place - Children will have access to resources to identify symbols and traditions of different religions as well as story books, information text books and holy books associated with each religion. There are also video links to help support children further

Curriculum Skills

  • Other skills developed e.g. social skills / oracy – a large majority of the RE curriculum will be discussion based. Therefore, RE plays a very important role in embedding speaking and listening skills. Teachers will have the opportunity to use oracy during most  activities

Curriculum Assessment and Intervention

  • How children will be assessed / tested? The Dudley Agreed Syllabus has recommended an eight level scale to assess children’s attainment and progress. They recommend that an age related Year 6 child should leave primary school on level 4. However, a greater depth child would leave primary school with some elements of level 5.

 

 

Level 1

Attainment target 1

Pupils recall the outlines of religious stories. They recognise features of religious life and practice. They recognise some religious symbols and words.

Attainment target 2

Pupils are able to make simple judgements expressing a personal view. They make use of very simple reasons usually expressed in a single clause.

Level 2

Attainment target 1

Pupils retell religious stories. They can identify some features of religious life and can begin to associate them with particular religions. They are able to suggest a meaning for a religious story or action.

Attainment target 2

Pupils are able to make simple judgements expressing a personal view. They make use of reasons which are usually in the form of identifying personal consequences or by a simple appeal to authority.

Level 3

Attainment target 1

Pupils are beginning to produce organised descriptions of religious beliefs, teachings and practices. They demonstrate a simple understanding of religious faith often using a single clause response and using generic words like ‘holy’ or ‘special’. Pupils make use of simple specialist vocabulary.

Attainment target 2

Pupils are able to express a personal view making use of reasons usually based on social consequences. Evidence to support their ideas is sparse or non-existent.

Level 4

Attainment target 1

Pupils have a rudimentary but reasonably secure knowledge and understanding of two religions one of which must be Christianity. They are acquainted with at least two other religions. They are able to produce organised descriptions of religious life. They also show an elementary knowledge of beliefs or teachings which are specific to particular religions. They demonstrate a simple understanding of religious faith often by linking statements together to provide a coherent account.

They make use of specialist religious vocabulary.

Attainment target 2

Pupils are able to support an opinion usually making use of relevant reasons. Some of these reasons may not be defensible or clearly distinct from each other. Linkage between statements is often unclear.

Level 5

Attainment target 1

Pupils demonstrate a basic and secure knowledge and understanding of two religions one of which must be Christianity. They are acquainted with at least two other religions. They are able to describe and, using reasons, are able to explain the significance and impact of beliefs, teachings and practices on the lives of believers. They show understanding by making reference to beliefs which are specific to a particular religion. They make use of specialist religious vocabulary and vocabulary specific to particular religions.

Attainment target 2

Pupils are able to present defensible reasons in support of an opinion which have to do with a religious or a moral issue. They show some understanding of the complexity of the issues by referring to at least another point of view.

(Taken from Dudley Agreed Syllabus 2013)

  • What happens if a child is underachieving – If a child is performing below age related expectations, specific support is needed in lessons. For example, RE is heavily discussion based so pairing a less able child with a more able child during discussions may aid their understanding. Additional adult support to be used where necessary and use of resources.
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